3 Broken Bones and a Lisfranc Injury

Last year I told you I had another WTF moment.  No surprise there, I’m sure. When I left the Immediate Care, they told me that I had broken two bones in my foot and would need to follow up with the orthopedic surgeon the following week.

On Monday,  I saw the KNEE surgeon.  (remember I had knee surgery the previous week) He said while they were able to do the Meniscous repair and “clean up” a bit inside of my knee, they were still recommending a partial knee replacement once I healed from my newest injury…smh

On Thursday, I saw the Foot Surgeon.  When he came into the room, he shook his head saying, “Well Grace, you really did a number on yourself this time”.

and then he said nothing and still nothing.

He stood there and continued to shake his head.  I’m not sure what the actual pose is called, but you know when someone is deep in thought and they almost rest their chin on their hand, slightly covering their mouth?  Well that’s the pose and the longer he had it, the more nervous I got.

Finally he sat down next to me and said, “Well you’ve got some options.  You have 4 broken bones and may have a torn ligament.  If we go in for surgery right now, I will have to place a plate and screws in each of the bones you’ve broken.”

Now it was my turn to be silent.

Holy shit!  No! No! No!  A million thoughts ran through my head mostly about all of the plans I had for the holidays.  I couldn’t wait to see the twins opening their presents on Xmas.  Thing 2 had just gotten a puppy and I was looking forward to training her.  etc etc

When I finally spoke it was to say, “This can’t be happening!”  Einstein quickly chimed in with, “Oh, it’s happening sweetheart”. (from the state farm JACKED UP commercial)

I pleaded, “But you said I have options right”?!?!?!

After much discussion, we decided to continue with R.I.C.E to allow the swelling to go down and to allow me some time to absorb all that he had told me.  I left his office that day in an orange split cast with instructions to stay in bed for the next two weeks with my foot elevated above my heart and the Ice machine continuously running on my knee.

leg above your head (7)

While laying in bed, I spent TOO much time on Google, researching the various options that might be possible.

 

 

 

Since that first day, I have been back to be recasted 4 times. I am currently sporting the ‘sexy’ black one.

There is still a lot of swelling, I’m not spending all my time in bed anymore though either.  The current plan is to remain in this cast until the 30th (unless the swelling continues to go down) Then evaluate the extent of the lisfranc injuries to determine the next step.  Hopefully the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th Metatarsals have begun to heal by then.

Some positive notes

  1.  amputation is not an option
  2. I have time to blog and catch up reading everyone I missed
  3. I am getting great upper body strength while using the wheelchair
  4. I have mastered getting 1/2 in and out of the tub without getting the cast wet, though not without making a bit of a mess.

beautiful tubs

 

 

 

 

 

 

What happened?!?!?!?

I can tell you the truth, but it is SO boring and lame, so instead I am asking you to tell me.  Many of you are incredible storytellers, so please help me with a humdinger that I can respond with while people are asking me over the next few months.  “What did you do?!?!?”

You tell me…. “What did I do?”

Look at the size of my foot compared to my ankle….WTF?!?!?!

Leaving your phone in a Lyft driver’s car

I walked into the hotel room at 12:30 am to drop off my bags and to park the wheelchair.

How do you reach your Lyft driver if you forgot something in their car?

When I walked into the room, “T” was awake, and still fuming about the height of the bed.  I unburied my tablet and asked T to use her phone.  Actually, I don’t think I asked, I think I just said I was taking it.  She  continued to complain about the hotel saying I needed to talk to the manager.  I put my hand up and said,  “we need to be awake at 4:30″, I can’t do this now.  I have to find my phone, or I won’t be going anywhere tomorrow”.

I headed back outside with phone and tablet in hand.  I sent several text messages to my phone hoping the driver might see them on a pop up.  I called Thing One to tell her that I had lost the phone and maybe I needed her to put a hold on it.  (My family each pays her $50.00 a month and we share unlimited everything on her account) I asked her to find a phone number for Lyft to report the loss.

She responded with the following screenshots:

This is all good in theory,   If you know your passwords.  I don’t!  My niece set up the Lyft app on my phone during my Boston trip over a year ago.  Crap ! Crap! Crap!

I filled out the Contact Lyft form using the hotel’s phone number and my email address for which I also don’t know the password.

ARGH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I suspended myself from most of my accounts trying to guess the passwords.  Those that didn’t suspend me, sent a verification email to my LOST cell phone. SMH!!!!!

Just as I was going to surrender… I remembered that my neighbor works nights…maybe I could call her?   IF only I actually knew her phone number instead of only having it stored in my phone?!?!?!?

Ah but wait a minute…we are friends on Facebook..and that is the one password I remember.  I sent her a message on Facebook messenger asking for her phone number and then called her from “T’s” phone.  It’s probably a sad thing that she wasn’t surprised in the least that I needed “bailing out”.  I asked her to go to my house with her key, and I would tell her where to find my list of passwords.

When I logged into my email account there was a message from Lyft that the driver had found my phone.  Somehow I was able to contact him and beg him to bring my phone back to me.  Lyft charges a $15.00 returned item fee.  I paid that and tipped him $20.00.

At 3:15 a.m. I finally crawled into bed.  Exhausted

At 4:45a.m, there was a knock on the door.  It was the front desk guy Brent.  He had spent most of the night/morning outside smoking with me while I tried to get my phone back.  He promised that if he didn’t see me surface from the room by 4:45 he would “bang” on the door.  He had also set up coffee and set out some of the cold breakfast items even though they don’t start breakfast until 6.  Yes I wrote an outstanding review for him and the hotel.

Grace: “T” We need to get going

“T” (from the bathroom), I’m working on it.  I’m gonna need you to help carry some of my bags.

Grace:  Growl….BAGS?!?! As in multiple?!??!?! How am I supposed to carry anything while I’m in a wheelchair?!?!

LOTS of cuss words

probably even a few more

I don’t even remember her response.  I loaded all 3 of her bags and my one bag onto the wheelchair and headed to the lobby to arrange the LYFT.

I’m going to insert a copy of the review that I left for Rosebud Taxi Service which explains in more detail how we ALMOST missed our train.

I am from the Chicagoland area, where Lyft’s are frequently used and also usually readily available. I made the poor assumption that they would also be readily available in Holland, MI. While I was able to use their services from the Amtrak Station in Holland to my hotel where I was staying, I was unable to locate a driver to get to the station at 5:30 in the morning. My companion and I were both traveling in wheelchairs, so I began requesting a ride using the lyft app at 5 am even though we did not need to be at the train station until 6:30. From 5 to 5:45am I could not find anything. At 5:45, our hotel receptionist had found the number for Rosebud Taxi Service. I called and explained our situation to a very nice gentleman, who not only apologized profusely that they wouldn’t be able to help with both chairs on so short of notice, but also gave me a phone number for a competitor who might be able to help. Who does that?!?! Wow! After speaking with his competition, I don’t think they are any competition at all, their response to my dilemma was, “sorry nope nothing we can do.” I went back to trying to obtain a ride from lyft, only to have the one driver cancel the ride because in his words, “I’m 20 mins out for a 4 minute ride, not worth my time.” I did explain that we would tip very well and would probably have to be transported separately. He said, “ no I’m cancelling.”
I think I literally cried to my companion to please call rosebud back while I continued to try to use the Lyft app with no luck. After explaining our tale of woe again, the owner of the company stopped what she was doing in her personal life and came to pick us up herself with a vehicle large enough to hold both of our wheelchairs. I have to ask again, “Who does that?” I am so grateful that there are people in the world who will still go the extra mile to help “rescue” someone in trouble. I truly feel that she “saved” us. It is also important to note that she didn’t charge us any extra for our additional “luggage or needs”. I wholeheartedly give Rosebud Taxi Service 5 stars and would recommend them to anyone!

I didn’t feel it necessary to add that the owner and T could/did not help me load the wheelchairs or luggage into the SUV.  BUT that’s when the BREAK happened. Everything happened in such a rush, I honestly don’t remember the exact point it happened.  Maybe I dropped one chair on top of the other?  Maybe I closed the seat on my finger?  In fact I am sure I did both of those things.

In the short 10 minute ride to the train station, my finger turned black.  Oh shit…. The ONE thing Einstein said before I left, “DON’T BREAK ANYTHING!!!”.  There was no doubt that it was broken :(.  Didn’t matter though, we had a train to catch.

I didn’t even try to use the wheelchair other than for baggage on the way home.  The fact that “T” was able to though without the use of her legs also supports that it is doable.

In closing, other suggestions I have for traveling alone in a wheelchair are:

  • pack as light as possible
  • print your tickets etc Do NOT rely on your phone
  • TRY to get some sleep.  (I’m pretty sure the 1 hour I got is what lead me to getting sick when I got home)
  • Plan for back up options should your original plans fall through.  (multiple transportation and hotel options.)
  • Know your limitations
  • Call your hotel or transportation method to check heights, dimensions etc.  It would not be unheard of to ask for pictures of your accommodations before committing.

As a side note, while the ADA suggests a bed height of 20-23 inches in handicap accessible rooms, although, it is NOT a requirement.

0726192149a

 

 

 

Just the facts please

I know I promised to write the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but the truth.  I am working on it, but first I want to share the tips and information that I learned during my adventure, so here are the facts.

In my last post, I gave the spoiler alert that it IS possible to go from the suburbs of Chicago to Chicago via the Metra train, and from Chicago to Holland, MI and back via the Amtrak train, while remaining in a wheelchair.  Did I do it?  Kind of….

Here’s the story…..

My FIRST challenge of the day was trying to figure out how to fit the wheelchair in my car. It does fit in the trunk WITHOUT the legs on it; however, there is no way that 2 wheelchairs, “T”, and my parents and I would all fit.  Although I had access to a car that would fit both wheelchairs, I did not know if “T” would be able to transfer into the other car since the seat was higher than mine.  I worked this out removing the legs of my wheelchair, and making my mom stay at home.  (she was disappointed)

First Piece of advice—Know your equipment.  It’s size and how it works.

We arrived at the Metra station almost 25 minutes early so I could survey the area. There was some confusion as to which track the train would be departing on, (the signs said one thing, and the map said another) but since I was getting on at the end or beginning of the line, (however you look at it) there would be time to change platforms if needed.

metra (3)
The sign says the opposite track

I opted to stay in the shade by the building rather than to cross to the side the sign advised.  (Yay I picked the right one)  Inkedmetra (4)_LI

 

 

When the train pulled into the station the ADA symbol for handicap accessible was clearly marked on the car.  What wasn’t clear was how I was going to get UP onto the train…

 

 

That question was quickly answered by not one but two of the conductors that got off the train to welcome me.  I must of looked nervous when I told them this was my first time traveling in a wheelchair, because they were both very quick to assure me that it was very easy and I would be an old pro, by the end of the trip.

I didn’t think to take pictures or a video of the lift at this point because I was too busy soaking it all in.  They were right though, it was easy.

metra (1).jpg

I rolled right off the lift ramp to a section of pull down seats for seniors or people in wheelchairs.

If there no one was using the seats, cyclists were able to park and tie down their bikes in front of them.

(There was a sign that clearly said they may be asked to move them if someone needed to use the seats)

I opted to stay in the wheelchair with my back to the wall of the car.

 

The bathroom was immediately to my left.  It also was wheelchair accessible, complete with a transfer seat and multiple safety bars.  I can’t speak for the position of the bars etc, as I mentioned in my last post.  I pulled as close as I could get, stood on one foot, and pivoted.  The location of the bars worked for me. 🙂

Getting INTO the bathroom was no problem.  For ME though, getting out proved to be a different story.  Again, the damn legs on the wheelchair….smh   Let me repeat that first piece of advice…. Know your equipment!!!!  I took the legs off the chair and maneuvered out of the bathroom wondering how I had gotten in there in the first place…

Check out the legs on this baby

From the front, they don’t look that cumbersome, but the side shot shows that with the legs attached, my wheelchair is as long as the kitchen table.

The train ride itself was smooth and a bit nostalgic for me.  Although a lot has changed since I rode the train to college in Chicago 20 years ago,  (they now have a rush hour QUIET car instead of a BAR CAR). The stops and sounds of the train were the same, but the scenery was so different.  I had forgotten how many times the conductors punch tickets, and that they called out the upcoming stop.

I spent most of my time talking to one of the two conductors and “people watching”.  There was a tiny altercation between two of the cyclists because one dumped the other’s bike while trying to retrieve his own, but it was over quickly.  In fact, if I made any recommendations to Metra, it would be maybe a bike rack instead of stacking, but who am I?

When the train pulled into Union Station, I waited until 90% of the people were off the train before heading for the door.  The conductor set up the lift for me, which again went very smoothly until I tried to roll off.  The “gate” that keeps you from rolling off the lift was stuck and neither of us were really sure how to operate it.  Eventually it opened and I was on my way.

Second piece of advice- allow extra time and be patient.

Rolling into the station was a work out for my arms, but it was doable.  I’m glad that I waited until the train was almost empty, because I didn’t feel rushed as I SLOWLY rolled inside.  I had plenty of time to go outside, find something to eat, and explore the different levels of Union Station.  Although all levels of the station could be accessed while in the wheelchair, the “general” signs were vague at best.  (in my opinion)  Several times I would follow a sign to go somewhere and end up at stairs or an escalator.  union station (5)

If I wasn’t able to backtrack on my own to the nearest ramp or elevator, there were plenty of people to ask for directions, both travelers and employees.

Let’s talk about ramps for a minute…. First of all…..

THERE ARE MANY!!!!

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a narrow hill road inside the forest

The more I used them the steeper they began to appear.  I was literally chanting “I think I can, I think I can” as I was climbing up the last few.

Believe it or not, going DOWN the ramps gave me more trouble.  I NEVER thought about the rug/wheel burn on your hands going downhill.

*Advice alert*— If you are “driving” a manual wheelchair….WEAR GLOVES!!!  Apparently they sell finger-less gloves for exactly this purpose.  Bonus tip- carry hand sanitizer with you, my hands were black…..

union station (4)

A visual reminder to wear gloves

For the most part, even though everyone was too wrapped up in their own objectives to notice things that were happening around them, only a small number of people almost ran into me.  Those that did were quick to apologize.  Except  for the girl that turned on a dime, and tripped over my legs in the process, causing her drink to go everywhere.  I’m going with… Karma…she didn’t even apologize….smh.

I found that if I followed somewhat closely behind someone going in the same direction, even though people didn’t see me, they had already sidestepped the person they could see in turn missing me.

As I waited in the “assisted waiting area” I received a call from “T”.  She yelled, “This hotel is NOT going to work!  I can’t even get into the bed it’s too high.” I responded, ” UM what do expect me to do about it?”  Followed by, ” Ok, then look for another hotel in the area.”  I know that I said I would tell the truth, the whole truth….. but I would have to write an entirely different long winded post about the rest of that conversation.  In short though, I told her I couldn’t help my train was boarding and to let me know what she figured out.

Boarding call for Amtrak 370 from Chicago to Holland Michigan

amtrak (4)

Although their website says “Redcaps” (people employed by Amtrak wearing red shirts) are available EVERYWHERE to help people with mobility issues and with luggage, the first time I actually saw them was standing right in front of the platform.   In fact, they were all in my way, barely moving as I rolled out to the platform.  I am glad that I had the foresight to figure out how to my carry a bag myself because no one was eager to assist.

*Advice alert*  pack only what you need and/ or can manage on your own

I rolled down the platform until I saw a conductor who told me where he would be setting up the lift.

Boarding with the lift was a piece of cake until I tried to fit through the door.  DAMN legs….grrr.  Once I took them off it was no problem.  Handicap seating was immediately inside the door of the car, on both sides of the train.  There was even a luggage compartment on the floor that I could reach.

Once the train departed, I decided to sit on the Amtrak transfer seat instead of the wheelchair seat.  I shouldn’t have.  While sitting in said seat I was traveling backward.  It took no more than 20 minutes for me to remember why I don’t do backward.  Yes I hurled :(, but yay I made it to the bathroom. 🙂

Once that nasty business was finished I tried to roll to the Bar or cafe car for some ginger ale, only to find out that the wheelchair would not fit.  It was close.  😦  Plan B.

I thought I would try to distract myself from my stomach unhappiness by posting an update on my Facebook page, msgracefulnot.com.  I did not expect to see this video appear. …… and the flood gates opened…….  (If you are new to “my world” the video is of my recently deceased GSD, SNUFF.)  Back to the bathroom.

Round 3

I sent “T” a text to see what she decided to do about the hotel.  She called instead of texted me to complain for 20 minutes.  Her friend helped her into the bed  before she left, and we would indeed be staying there.  I said, “Okay, see you at 11” and hung up the phone.  As I sat there reviewing the days events in my head, I decided to walk to the Bar car.  Yes I WALKED to the cafe and justified it by telling myself that I wouldn’t “learn” anything else for the next few hours anyway.  I would just resume my test when I was going to detrain, disembark, get off…not sure what it’s called.

amtrak (16)

When I entered the bar car, I was informed that the closest thing they had to ginger ale was CLUB SODA.

Never having tried it before I decided to give it a try.

It is NOTHING like ginger ale……. ewwww  😦

After I returned to my seat, I stopped the conductor as he passed by to see if he would mind answering a few questions for me.

He didn’t mind.

I briefly explained my “test” and told him that I was not able to fit through the aisle with my wheelchair to go to the Cafe Car.  I asked,  “What would someone in my position do, especially if they were on a longer ride than me?  He responded, “Well people in wheelchairs generally don’t travel alone.”…. My FACE said, “and then you met me.”  He said if someone needed something from the CAFE, he would happily get it for them…. shrug ok?

I have several suggestions for Amtrak should they ever decide to update their handicap accessibility information.  Cafe access is on my list, if I ever do send them my suggestions, I will provide a link here if that happens.

My conclusion of whether or not the trains are accessible for wheelchair travel is Yes, they are.  I am not saying that it is easy or super convenient, but it is doable with enough planning.

2000 words already?  I have only just begun….smh  I am going to end here for today.  If you are interested in hearing about all the dramatic parts of the trip, please check back next week where I will tell you about the drunk guy harassing me, how I broke my finger, and why I almost missed my train on the way home.

Thank you all for spending your time with me.  Maybe some of the information I share is useful?  I appreciate all of your comments and feedback!

 

 

 

Italy or Bust..or in my case BUST then…

Remember this old thing?  Well calling it old wouldn’t really be true, considering it is brand new………..

Confused yet?

Let me TRY to explain…

Do you remember, back in September of last year, I had a plate and screws put in my right foot? I was in a cam boot for a long time afterwards, and have only been walking in very hard soled shoes for the last few months.  A couple of weeks ago, while I was at my oldest daughter’s house watching the grandbabies, I took off my shoes while playing with the boys in their room.    Here’s where it gets confusing…..

I’m not sure exactly what I did or how exactly I did it.  I was holding Joey, and attempted to squat down on the floor with him.  I subsequently lost my balance, and in an effort to not drop him I did something very painful to my foot.  I don’t know what I did exactly, I just knew that it hurt like hell and I couldn’t stand on it let alone walk.

A trip to the immediate care and subsequent trip to the surgeon’s office revealed that I broke the lag screw from my surgery, and another bone in my foot.

I have no words.  Seriously who does this?  I have spent the last few weeks feeling embarrassed and in shock.

I am back in a boot for the next 3-5 weeks, and then the plan is to try to ease back into hard shoes.  If the pain is too great or the bone hasn’t healed around the broken screw, I will have to have another surgery.  😦

So there is the Busted (broken part)…what do I mean about Italy?

Earlier this year, Einstein’s dad gave us several buddy passes for his employers airline.  If you aren’t familiar with buddy passes, in short you are able to fly standby on the airline for next to nothing.  (taxes)  Anywhere.

I have a good friend who was born and raised in Italy, but has lived in the states for many years.  Her family still owns a home in the city she grew up in…..AND….they are going to be there for the month of May……………hmmmmmm

I have been to Italy 2x in the past, but it has been almost 20 years, and I was there as a tourist.  I have always wanted to experience activities of daily living in Italy, but never had the time, or the money.  I have the time, and the flight cost me $50.00 roundtrip, so I booked the tickets.

I am not nearly as prepared as I would like to have been,  ( I speak very little Italian and I have a broken foot.)  but I think I would regret not seizing the opportunity.  Who knows, the afternoon siesta’s may be just what I need.

I am supposed to fly out on Monday.  Wish me luck?